Customer theft: is it need or is it greed? A case study of Portsmouth

Morris, Stephanie (2008) Customer theft: is it need or is it greed? A case study of Portsmouth. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The present study aims to investigate shoplifting behaviour in relation to criminological literature and apply criminological theories to such behaviour in order to explain it. This will be achieved through the use of classical criminology, rational choice theory, routine activity theory, social control theory and strain theory. The investigation aims to develop an enhanced understanding as to why individuals shoplift and potentially offer advice and recommendations from the research for this form of behaviour. The primary research was carried out via the use of questionnaires and the secondary research was collected from Hampshire Constabulary regarding offenders who shoplifted from Co-Op stores throughout 2007 in Copnor and Northend. The results from the questionnaires were discussed and compared to the official statistics in order to distinguish any correlations of opinions. Furthermore this information explored suggestions as to why individuals shoplift, drawing on and comparing the opinions of Co-Op staff and police officers. The study concludes that people who shoplift from the Co-Op stores in Portsmouth are perceived to be between the ages of 16 and 30, using illegal drugs, have very little or no education and are unemployed. Respondents believed all of the acts committed by such offenders were made through rational decisions and were aware of any consequences that they may potentially face.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:48
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:14
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/510

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