Occupational exposure: a study of the relationship between airborne ultrafine particles and a submarine’s recirculating air filtration system

Oliver, Martin (2011) Occupational exposure: a study of the relationship between airborne ultrafine particles and a submarine’s recirculating air filtration system. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Epidemiological studies have established a direct correlation between exposure to airborne ultrafine particles (U.F.P.) and the increased occurrence in respiratory and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality rates. These developments have heightened the need for a greater understanding of occupational exposure on submarines, but more specifically, the association between particle production and control. Submariners operate for several months within an enclosed, re-circulated environment where many of the everyday functions required to sustain their operational tasking, contribute to the ultrafine aerosols found onboard. Electrostatic precipitation (E.S.P.) is the primary method of particle removal; yet, limited research has been conducted at this scale to determine whether the extent and rate of removal is a suitable and sufficient control measure. Aerosol sampling, using a TSI® P-Trak Ultrafine Particle Counter (Model 8525) and a TSI® DustTrak Aerosol Monitor (Model 8520) was performed onboard H.M.S. Vengeance during an extended dived period and the results have clearly demonstrated that, despite the E.S.P. performance diminishing over the patrol period, concentrations were assessed to be well within acceptable limits. The results are not only reassuring for the future wellbeing of submarine crews but also a positive step forward in the fight against occupational exposure.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: ?? EDAM ??
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 26 Aug 2011 12:55
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:43
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/4586

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