The financial and social impacts due to the creation of the P2P revolution

Arshadi-Yarahmadi, Amirreza (2007) The financial and social impacts due to the creation of the P2P revolution. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The conflicts between the peer-to-peer revolution and the music were evident from 1999 to present day documented by media coverage. My role was to evaluate, analyse and improve primary research and secondary research to validate my hypothesis that the emergence of the P2P software has had a substantial negative impact on the music industry financially and socially. I found that out of my four main areas of research in this paper (questionnaire, interview, Ifpi/Riaa and analysis of existing literature sectioned through time) only one (questionnaire) confirmed the validity of the hypothesis, the remaining three forms of research proved the hypothesis wrong and opened my eyes to new realities. As in the words of Carl Marx if "religion is the opium of the masses" then in my case I modify the claim to "the media is the opium of the masses". If you live your whole life on estimates then some of the secondary research illustrates that there is drop in sales for the relevant period, but no correlation between P2P and decline in sales, the application for proving this correlation is inconclusive and not 100% accurate, In fact I proved that by 2010 the revenue gained from digital sales far exceed the forecasted revenue lost, also that piracy levels have dropped significantly since the birth of P2P which I feel has converted the majority of the piracy customers to P2P users, finally with the promotional success of the mp3 player seems that P2P software has indirectly funded the music industry as well.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Portsmouth Business School > Accounting and Financial Management
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:48
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:14
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/458

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