AAC software: could businesses in the UK be making better use of software available to enable people with communciation difficuties due to ASD to enter the workplace?

Garrard, Kathryn (2010) AAC software: could businesses in the UK be making better use of software available to enable people with communciation difficuties due to ASD to enter the workplace? BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    As the number of diagnoses of Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) increases, it is important to look at ways in which successful employment can be aided for those people. Communication is often an issue for people with ASD so this study project set out to investigate if, and how, businesses could be doing more to allow for the implementation of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) software within the workplace. In order to fully evaluate the current situation existing literature on the topics of ASD and AAC have been analysed and seven organisations of various industry and size interviewed to discover their policies, procedures, and awareness of the options available.

    A variety of AAC software is now available commercially and through open source projects and can be used on many every day, accessible platforms, such as a laptop or smart phone. However, results found that the majority of organisations were not aware of these and simply rely on outsourced support for any required knowledge or recommendations, although all were aware of the funding that is available if reasonable adjustments are required for someone to carry out their job effectively.

    A major finding of this study was the lack of standardised structure amongst organisations with regards to the responsibilities and number of departments involved in the process of employing someone with a disability. Therefore, a recommendation to come from this project is that businesses should consider streamlining their process to enable simplification and ensure maximum efficiency and expertise.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Technology > School of Computing
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 03 Aug 2011 10:11
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:41
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/4335

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