How has the 1988 Indian Gaming Regulatory Act affected American Indian lives, and in what way have non-Indians perceptions changed because of it?

Akers, Laura (2010) How has the 1988 Indian Gaming Regulatory Act affected American Indian lives, and in what way have non-Indians perceptions changed because of it? BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (626kB)

    Abstract

    This dissertation focuses on the representations and treatment of American Indians within US society and how this has evolved with the expansion of tribal gaming. The dissertation focuses on the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act (IGRA) of 1988, and also looks at the complications of Indian nations supposed sovereign status. For a tribe to be sovereign, they need to be federally recognised by the US government who can abolish this status at any time. The ability for a tribe to remain sovereign is key to the success of IGRA. Although a tribe should be able to do whatever they wish with their land because legally it is not US soil, each tribe remains subject to both national and state regulations. IGRA made much progress toward allowing some tribes to open a profitable casino, but stipulations of a tribal-state compact often hinder the chances of this actually happening. After the controversial court case of Seminole Tribe of Florida v. Florida (1996), the supreme court ruled that should a compact not be reached, IGRA cannot grant jurisdiction over a state that does not consent to be sued.

    The second half of this dissertation is dedicated to the mispresentation of American Indians as a result of Indian gaming through a ‘casino Indian’ stereotype, via various outlets such as television, films, newspapers, and sporting events. The majority of images presented are from a non-Indian perspective and do not show a true representation of American Indians. However, in some cases American Indians conform to the expectations of non-Indians for the purpose of earning money from tourists; and since many assume all American Indians to be one nation (rather than each tribe being their own separate nation), those who conform to the stereotype taint the image of those who remain true to their American Indian culture. American Indian standards of living and political position are the strongest they have ever been. Indian gaming has provided the opportunity for tribes to be actively ‘seen’ within the community. It is this achievement that has inspired this dissertation.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Languages and Area Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 03 Aug 2011 09:28
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:41
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/4331

    Actions (login required)

    View Item

    Document Downloads

    More statistics for this item...