Flawed leadership, ideological weakness and the failure of the Black Panther Party 1966-1974

Redhead, Chris (2010) Flawed leadership, ideological weakness and the failure of the Black Panther Party 1966-1974. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The Black Panther Party (BPP) emerged in 1966 as a radical organisation aimed at empowering black people in the United States. Their anti-establishment stance brought the Black Panthers fame and popularity in the last years of the 1960s, but also brought them into conflict with the Government and law enforcement agencies. Just as swiftly as they had risen, the Black Panthers went into a steep decline in the early 1970s.

    This dissertation examines why the Black Panther Party lost the support of the black community, was deserted by its members, and failed to achieve any of the major goals it aspired to. Several possible reasons for the Party’s failure are considered, and the significance of both internal and external forces evaluated. This dissertation contends that ultimately it was internal failings, such as poor leadership and a weak ideology, which were most influential in bringing down the Black Panther Party.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Languages and Area Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 03 Aug 2011 09:16
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:41
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/4327

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