A discussion of the implications of maternal imprisonment on the outcomes for mother & child

Clark, Sharon (2011) A discussion of the implications of maternal imprisonment on the outcomes for mother & child. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Research suggests that 18,000 children are separated from their mothers each year by imprisonment. Of these, at least one third of the women are single parents. This dissertation has been designed to examine critically whether mothers should be separated from their children, as is the current UK practice, or whether the need for punishment for the offence should be balanced against a more child centred approach that improves outcomes for this marginalised group within society.

    The introduction conceptualises the problems associated with incarcerated mothers and the consequent separation from their children. It also incorporates the aims and objectives of this dissertation. Ethical considerations will also be included. The key legislative Acts will be outlined. The current service provision is then deconstructed with supporting statistics to demonstrate the scale of the problem. The outcomes for incarcerated mothers are explored taking into account offending patterns, the profile of female prisoners and the theoretical explanations for female offending. Attachment theory is critically examined as a tool to identify whether separation best serves the child and the outcomes for the child who has been separated from their primary care giver as a result of imprisonment are critically explored within the context of attachment theory.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > School of Health Sciences and Social Work
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 28 Jul 2011 10:04
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:40
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/4207

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