Severe domestic squalor: an exploration into the historical and contemporary research on understanding lives of squalor and the challenges this has presented to professional involvement

Brockwell, Christina (2011) Severe domestic squalor: an exploration into the historical and contemporary research on understanding lives of squalor and the challenges this has presented to professional involvement. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This aim of this research was to critically examine the paradoxes and complexities involved in recognizing lives of squalor and how this impacts upon service users and professional involvement.

    This paper argues that research and terminology have identified this living situation as prevalent to older people and have largely overlooked its relationship with younger people, especially children. This over-identification has created barriers and discrimination that can hinder access to support and intervention. It proposes that future research should incorporate the voices of people who have experienced this living situation. Their experience holds great value for guiding its future.

    This research paper has been undertaken in the form of a literature review with a systematic approach to gathering information. Through social construction, medical and social models this paper has attempted to provide an explanation of why knowledge of this situation is under developed in mainstream health and social care organizations.

    This subject is highly relevant for all areas of contemporary social work practice and in particularly developing the voice of service user’s to ensure they have adequate knowledge to gain the necessary support they need.

    It is important to state this paper is not concerned with squalid living conditions which can be directly associated with poverty but with domestic squalor that is attributed through hoarding behaviours and an unclean living environment.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > School of Health Sciences and Social Work
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 28 Jul 2011 09:37
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:40
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/4199

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