How foster children view the care system during and after their placements

Lowe, Chelsea (2011) How foster children view the care system during and after their placements. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This study comprised a narrative analysis of autobiographies and accounts of children that have experienced foster care and how they view the care system; their placements and leaving care, carried out to explore the personal experiences of service users who are a product of the care system. A systematic reviewing method of autobiographical and personal narratives was adopted to ensure the findings were taken from first-hand experience. The research data was collated and then critically analysed using a thematic approach, adhering to methods of discourse and narrative analysis. Core themes, feelings and experiences were identified and comprehensively discussed. Through critical analysis, the research findings clearly identified strong correlations between service user experiences of abuse and behaving violently and lacking compassion towards others. Other key themes included education and employment, moving placements and the quality of support, when leaving care. This review presents how critical analysis of qualitative data can positively contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of the experiences of young people that have been in the care system during their childhood. This increased understanding of what the child goes through and how they feel, should allow both social workers and also foster carers’ greater insight and thereby improve the effectiveness of their work.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > School of Health Sciences and Social Work
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 27 Jul 2011 16:56
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:40
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/4184

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