Deconstructing Behavioural, Emotional and Social Difficulties (BESD): A critical exploration of underlying discourse and how pupils' experience the use of the label in secondary school settings

Gibbs, Susie (2011) Deconstructing Behavioural, Emotional and Social Difficulties (BESD): A critical exploration of underlying discourse and how pupils' experience the use of the label in secondary school settings. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The aim of this dissertation was to undertake a literature review of qualitative research pertaining to both the voices of and the experiences of children and young people labelled as having Behavioural, Emotional and Social Difficulties (BESD) by exploring the experiences of children labelled as having BESD through articles, journals and books and to suggest solutions which may improve their experiences. A systematic review of databases was undertaken along with a hand search of key journals and books. The search strategy found 7 papers which related solely to the voices of children/young people labelled as having BESD. These were used to identify common themes and were reported in the Findings section. Other literature pertaining to children/young people labelled as having BESD was reviewed and used in the ‘Behavioural, Emotional and Social Difficulties’ chapter and in discussion. A synthesis of data found in the selected 7 papers uncovered several key themes that were consistent in all the studies. These related to the awareness of being labelled, the dislike of being stigmatised by teachers and pupils and unfairly treated by teachers, and the need to have a positive relationship with teachers. These themes were then used for the discussion and to make suggestions for the improvement of the children’s/young people’s experiences. The study also deconstructs the labelling process within schools and exposes the way that this leads to self-fulfilling behaviour by pupils so labelled and to a ‘deviant’ sub-culture within schools. This review shows that synthesising data can uncover consistencies in results which can lead to a greater understanding of children’s and young people’s experiences. It reveals that there is not enough literature written which solely uses the direct voices of children/young people labelled as having BESD. It also reveals that changes need to be made in teacher education and whole-school approaches to inclusion and the modelling of social skills and that labelling children damages their self-esteem and self-efficacy.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > School of Health Sciences and Social Work
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 27 Jul 2011 15:51
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:40
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/4180

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