"Guns and umbrellas": to what extent do environmental factors play a significant role in determining the duration of civil conflict, from 1945-2006?

Patuck, Rosie (2007) "Guns and umbrellas": to what extent do environmental factors play a significant role in determining the duration of civil conflict, from 1945-2006? BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Civil wars have caused death and destruction for centuries, and for many countries the persistence and duration of these wars can, and has severely affected the extent of long term damage caused. Reviewing recent studies on the effect of environmental factors such as rough terrain, forest cover, and availability of natural resources, produced conflicting results between studies as to whether they prolong or reduce civil war duration. The measure of rainfall is used as a surrogate measure for the environment and tested with civil war duration, producing no relationship, but highlighting many issues associated with the definition of civil war. The statistics indicated that measures such as rainfall and temperature as individual factors do not effect the duration of civil war. These conflicting findings of the role played by environmental factors, are to some extent due to the strict and differing death criterion applied to quantitative studies of civil war duration, which requires a greater degree of consensus and amalgamation.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > Department of Geography
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:48
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:14
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/407

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