Does soil aggregate stability vary across fields that have been continuously used for different agricultural practises?

Cudlipp, Ella R. (2007) Does soil aggregate stability vary across fields that have been continuously used for different agricultural practises? BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (714kB)

    Abstract

    This paper sets out to investigate whether different continuous agricultural land uses have an impact on the soil and therefore aggregate stability. Aggregate stability plays an important role in agriculture as it benefits crop production and ecosystem health. Aggregate stability can be tested by a variety of methods, most commonly used are wet sieving and raindrop simulation experiments, where the characteristics of rainfall breakdown aggregates, therefore testing the stability. Aggregate stability is most commonly related to the percentage of organic matter in the soil, as well as any pedoturbation activities the land may experience, these will all be investigated, such as earthworm activity and farming practices such as tilling. The impacts of the different land uses will be examined by these experiments, including earthworm counts. There are three field sites consisting of a Jersey Royal potato field, which is cultivated regularly with seasonal crop, a grass field that has the purpose of grazing for Jersey cattle, and finally a field which main land use is predominately an orchard, but does however experience some grazing by cattle. All three sites are from a similar area of land in the North of Jersey and therefore should not differ in how they are made up, therefore particle sizing will be undertaken to ensure this, and that all further experiments will be measuring aggregate stability and factors that affect it, concluding whether different agricultural land uses have had an impact.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > Department of Geography
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:47
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:13
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/383

    Actions (login required)

    View Item

    Document Downloads

    More statistics for this item...