The contamination and mobility characteristics of lead and copper in non-artificial derelict rifle range target slope/butt soil profiles

Sinden, Nicholas (2007) The contamination and mobility characteristics of lead and copper in non-artificial derelict rifle range target slope/butt soil profiles. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Heavy metals do not degrade and are toxic to biological and ecological systems therefore they will always be an environmental concern, especially when a contamination occurs. Very large quantities of metallic Pb are used for the creation of ammunition, much of it being deposited at firing ranges for military and recreational target practice. Past research on rifle ranges soil has focused on the geochemical weathering reactions of Pb bullets in the soil of firing ranges in current use, the abrasion rates of bullets (Jorgensen & Williams, 1987; Lin, 1996; Lin et al., 1995) and the mobility of Pb of ranges in current use, whereas the mobility of Pb and Cu throughout older non artificial derelict rifle range soils need to be understood to a greater degree as leaching over longer time periods may have a more significant affect on the environment. The concentrations of Copper (Cu) derived from the jacket around the lead bullet throughout a soils profile needs examining too. Using statistical and graphical software I was able to analyse how the Lead (Pb) and Copper (Cu) is travelling through the soil relative to the characteristics of the soil and topography of the target slope. The analysis produced very interesting results showing that Lead (Pb) and Copper (Cu) is at very hazardous levels, and has been leaching into subsurface horizons at higher rates than artificial rifle ranges in current use, and that Pb and Cu mobility is related to the slope angle and acidity of the soil horizons within the soil profile. There are many non-artificial derelict rifle ranges just like this one all over the United Kingdom that could be interfering with local plant and insect habitats. Rifle ranges sharing similar environments and acidic soil characteristics to this one in East Sussex are probably sharing very similar characteristics.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > Department of Geography
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:47
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:13
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/376

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