Place and fear: a study of the fear of violent crime among students at the University of Portsmouth

Dear, Joshua (2007) Place and fear: a study of the fear of violent crime among students at the University of Portsmouth. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Traditional approaches to mapping fear of crime are limited to describing where and who people are afraid of. Using empirical and valid information from previous research and in-depth qualitative primary methods, a social geography of students fear is developed. Five important areas of analysis are highlighted: gender-based differences, effects of streetscape and the built environment, fear and anxiety of certain other social groups, how perceptions of fear and crime are formed and what methods do students adopt to keep themselves 'safe'. Through the analysis of interview based data collection, this work considers both the causes of fear of crime and the associations that have been identified in shaping perceptions of that crime. The paper does not only address who is the most fearful and who is the most feared as much of the previous research does. But seeks to answer why? And what can be done to reduce that fear. This work considers both the relationship between students fear and the built environment and the groups within that environment. While certain areas are often identified, as are certain people and processes in relation to fear, the paper reflects much broader processes operating to create and reduce fear. "Fear influences our experience of places, as much as places influence our experiences of Fear" (Koskela & Pain 1999).

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > Department of Geography
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:47
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:13
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/374

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