To determine the degree of surface level change throughout the East Anglian Fenlands from the 19th to 20th century, utilising GIS methods to explain the anthropogenic and physical causes within the landscape

Sumnall, Matthew (2007) To determine the degree of surface level change throughout the East Anglian Fenlands from the 19th to 20th century, utilising GIS methods to explain the anthropogenic and physical causes within the landscape. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The Fenlands of East England has been a region devoted to agricultural development for many hundreds of years. Originally the region could not support a large population, due to high water table levels covering much of the fens. The drainage of the region has a long history, beginning in Roman times, however it is generally accepted that the majority of the drainage works commenced in the 17th century, and virtually all drained by end of the nineteenth century. The Fens are a very low lying area, the majority of which is no more than 5m above mean sea level. As Drainage operations commenced, surface lowering was reported, often attributed to the break down of peat soils. Maps are presented showing the spatial patterns of the surface level over the time frame 1850 to 1993, showing a lowering over time, as well as possible physical causes such as drainage works, geology and soil type. The area determined to have altered most in the 140 years is surprisingly silt land, brought about primarily by new drainage infrastructure. It is shown that each of these can have an influence on an areas surface level, different combinations of which forming different results.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > Department of Geography
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:47
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:13
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/362

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