To what extent does a covering layer of snow reduce the diurnal temperature cycle experienced at the ground surface level in the Arctic

Rowlands, Andrew (2007) To what extent does a covering layer of snow reduce the diurnal temperature cycle experienced at the ground surface level in the Arctic. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This study will look at the effect that seasonal snow packs have on the ground temperatures in the Arctic. Whilst the effectiveness of a snow pack of on insulating the ground from the air temperature changes is the main focus of the study, the influence of the aspect of the slope will also be investigated. To accomplish this a series of five snow profiles were dug, one on each aspect of the slope and the fifth on the summit to act as a control, with in these snow profiles four temperature loggers were placed at set heights to record how changes in the surface air temperature was felt through the snow pack. When the data was analysed it was found that no diurnal temperature cycle was detectable and so the depths this penetrated to could not be studied, it was found that the longer term temperature changes were reduced greatly within the top 15cm. An interesting thing to come out of the data was that there was an effect of aspect. The data also showed that although only to a small extent there was a lag in the temperature signal recorded by the loggers as the snow depth increased.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > Department of Geography
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:47
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:13
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/345

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