To evaluate public opinion on development with socioeconomic factors as boundaries, using the Belle Greve Bay in Guernsey as the study area

Gill, Carol (2007) To evaluate public opinion on development with socioeconomic factors as boundaries, using the Belle Greve Bay in Guernsey as the study area. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Public interest in major development is increasing throughout the United Kingdom and this trend is also reflected in the Channel Islands. Guernsey is currently considering a ���£500 million proposal which has been openly presented for public scrutiny. The proposer, the Long Port Group, has faced fierce opposition including petitions and a protest march. This dissertation investigates the public attitude towards this development in relation to socioeconomic factors. The principal factors addressed are age, gender and location. In a study by Tomljenovic and Faulkner (1999), results revealed that older and younger population groups were not in equal favour, but were equally ambivalent towards the proposals. The current study did, however, agree with Mason and Cheyne (2000) that men are significantly more accepting and supportive of development than women. Interestingly, the sexes cite differing reasons to support their viewpoints. Finally, Hester (1993) stated that people, who live near 'sacred' locations such as waterfronts, when under threat, protect them. This correlates with the views expressed by the Guernsey population. The Island is noted for natural beauty and the residents are very protective of its entire coastline, which is viewed as an important heritage issue. In conclusion, if additional research into the various factors might reveal a high degree of context sensitivity.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > Department of Geography
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:47
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:13
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/344

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