Risk related interventions in Youth Offending Teams: with specific reference to substance misuse and mental health

Kimber, Hayley (2007) Risk related interventions in Youth Offending Teams: with specific reference to substance misuse and mental health. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This thesis is concerned with risk related intervention in Youth Offending Teams (YOTs) with specific reference to Substance Misuse and Mental Health and the extent to which appropriate services are accessible. The study aims to review the relative importance of Substance Misuse and Mental Health as specific risk factors, contributing to a young person's offending behaviour within the work of Youth Offending Teams. The study also aims to identify services that are available, services required and their priorities. The thesis reviews the academic literature relating to the risk factors associated with youth offending. Academic literature has highlighted that there is a lack of an evidence base of research on Substance Misuse, Mental Health, and young offenders, specifically those attending YOTs. Primary research was then conducted using a survey design with data collected by questionnaire. The questionnaire focused on two main themes. Firstly, it investigated the scale and relative importance of Substance Misuse and Mental Health as specific risk factors, within the risk assessment (ASSET) of young people attending YOTs. Secondly, it explored the extent to which appropriate services addressing Substance Misuse and Mental Health are available, both within YOTs and through external services. The research concluded that Substance Misuse and Mental Health are relatively important in comparison with other risk factors contributing to a young persons offending behaviour. The prevalence of these risk factors among young offenders has been identified as high. Professionals working with young offenders rating high on the assessment for these factors, can lack in confidence in what to do. Professionals often refer young offenders on their caseloads to either in-house or specialist agencies. The findings from this research would indicate that respondents feel that in-house or external agencies are at times inaccessible; services do not meet the needs of the individual young person and there is a lack of support work for families. Staff working within YOTs also feel that they are not adequately trained to deal with issues of Substance Misuse and Mental Health. They particularly feel in need of support in relation to Mental Health.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:47
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:13
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/335

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