Control orders in the United Kingdom: a proportionate and justifiable response to international terrorism?

Parsons, Sophie V. (2010) Control orders in the United Kingdom: a proportionate and justifiable response to international terrorism? BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    On September 11th 2001, the world witnessed a new phenomenon of terrorism as they watched two Boeing passenger aeroplanes crash into the World Trade Centre in New York. It suddenly became very clear that a new threat was upon the Westem world and that these nations were no longer the powerful and protected; they were now the victims. This dissertation will examine the terrorism phenomenon and how it has evolved since 9/11. It will include a history of terrorism and counter-terrorism in the UK, and an examination on the difficulties in reaching an agreed definition of 'terrorism'. An analysis of how the UK has responded to this threat will follow, with a specific focus on the legislative Acts the government has introduced post 9/11. The control orders regime provides the main focus for this analysis because it has provoked a long-standing debate over the ability to strike a balance between security and protecting civil rights. This dissertation will question the proportionality and fairness of these orders and address the government's justifications for the use of such measures in an attempt to conclude whether the use of control orders is a proportionate and justifiable tool for combating international terrorism. Due to the subject of this dissertation and certain protections that are in place, a literature review method was used to detemine that the control order system is not a fair or proportionate counter-terrorism measure that only hinders the fight against terrorism.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 19 May 2011 17:15
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:31
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/3021

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