Technological bodies: the representation of the human body in science fiction cinema

Whyley, Robert A. (2007) Technological bodies: the representation of the human body in science fiction cinema. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    In, Technological Bodies: The Representation of the Human Body in Science Fiction Cinema, I endeavour to uncover how the human body is represented in science fiction film, through the image of the cyborg and mecha. Key films of the relevant eras will be looked at closely in order to compare different notions of how the body is conveyed, not only in a visual sense, but also through a political and historical context. It was clear that when investigating different cultures, particularly the West in contrast to the East, the portrayal of the body was significant to the decade in which it was released, in respect to its representation in film. Whereas the Western example was governed by politics and the upsurge in a more body conscious society, the Eastern equivalent showcased the need for technological superiority. The research undertaken for this dissertation involved looking at a number of sources such as books, journals, film, television and the internet. I started by wanting to start with the origins of the cyborg and its subsequent formulation into both narrative and film form, followed by a predominately strong background into the creation of both the cyborg and mecha. I believed this was an important direction to take, because on undertaking the research, it was evident that the cyborg and mecha design was a result of a number of constituting factors.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Media and Performing Arts
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:47
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:13
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/292

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