Is the increasingly common trend amongst contemporary European directors to incorporate scenes of excessive violence, sex and subjects of a controversial nature, impacting on the way we enjoy films?

Taylor, Holly (2007) Is the increasingly common trend amongst contemporary European directors to incorporate scenes of excessive violence, sex and subjects of a controversial nature, impacting on the way we enjoy films? BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This study developed from an intrigue in contemporary European films that have received notoriety for their explicit imagery. Whilst it is clear that shock causes hype which in many cases results in success, the study hoped to prove that this was not the intention of the contemporary European directors responsible for producing such reactionary cinema. By focussing on three main areas of interest which commonly cause controversy amongst viewers and critics, these being excessive sex, violence and subjects of a controversial nature, this study discovers that these elements are no longer employed for marketing purposes, but in actual fact to encourage viewers to reconsider what they have previously accepted as entertainment and question what purpose this new excess has. By delving into the history of these three areas of excess, this study illustrates the evolution of acceptability and how as violence and sex become more commonplace in films, audiences become desensitised to the images. Therefore, contemporary European directors resort to excess in order for their films to have impact rather than simply be consumed by their audience and so this study concludes that the explicit imagery is intended to raise questions in the audience. This is discovered from research carried out from theoretical books and more recent online journals which in particular reveal the reception of such excessive films. A wide variety of films are also used to build up a basis for the argument and textual analysis of several scenes supports the notion of excess as a new genre.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Media and Performing Arts
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:47
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:13
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/275

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