Working at height in construction: risk taking behaviour in relation to falls from lower-level activities among micro-businesses and small, medium enterprises

Ford, Kevan (2006) Working at height in construction: risk taking behaviour in relation to falls from lower-level activities among micro-businesses and small, medium enterprises. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Evidence suggests that low-level work at height is not perceived to be hazardous HSE (Health and Safety Executive)(2004), yet official accident statistics show that a higher number of serious injuries occur during low-level work at height activities than higher levels HSC (Health and Safety Commission) (2005). The construction industry is of concern to the HSE due to the high number of fatalities resulting from falls. In particular the smaller to medium size enterprises and the micro-businesses that make up the majority of the industry are considered difficult to reach. McKinney, P. (2002). Whilst perhaps not unique, the statistics identify that there is a divide of management and trades, as a few larger contractors use the pool of labour from the many smaller ones, effectively meaning that larger contractors are virtually purely managing contractors.

    This research targets the divide of management and trade operatives, those that ‘plan’ and those that ‘do’. The intent is to discover if planning through the assessment process makes a difference in practice, seeking differences in perception of risk between the groups. The research goes further in observing malpractice in the field and questioning those that act in such a manner to determine reasoning, taking a more proactive view than a case study of accidents.

    Conclusions drawn from previous workshop sessions as part of industry research by Bomel Ltd on behalf of the HSE (2004) have contributed to the design of this research, which aims to further test findings made from their report. Other previous studies of working at height have been made with respect to pole ladder safety and therefore different types of access equipment were selected for this research. Unfortunately this did have a narrowing effect on the observational opportunities and therefore number of participants.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Technology > Learning at Work
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 11 May 2011 15:36
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:29
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/2666

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