Visual media, newspapers & the coverage of 9/11

Michaelides, Natasha (2010) Visual media, newspapers & the coverage of 9/11. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the unique ways in which both written news and visual media inform and influence their consumers. By concentrating on how these mediums cover stories this document provides an insight of which medium is the most popular form and which one the public rely on for fast and accurate news. Focusing on the unique techniques three mediums use to draw in the consumer three popular mediums have been examined; newspapers, televised news and documentaries, centring around the most covered tragedy of decade, September 11th 2001. This event has been used as a means to investigate how each individual medium covered this day, how they influenced their audiences and which one is deemed the most reliable. This document investigates the advantages and disadvantages of all mediums by covering extensive qualitative primary and secondary research. The majority of the research used in this document has been carried out using reliable primary research, books, the World Wide Web and documentaries. For secondary research semi-structured interviews have been conducted providing evidence from the public who shared their thoughts regarding the attacks carried out on September 11th 2001; still and visual images were demonstrated to them in order to discover which medium serves as the most influential and believable. All mediums have unique aspects to them but after extensive research this document will discover which medium serves the public best providing; informative, entertaining, gripping and reliable information.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Creative Technologies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 04 May 2011 14:03
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:28
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/2613

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