Nonlinear video editing: the answer to your prayers or the devil in disguise?

Thomas-Shell, Krystin (2010) Nonlinear video editing: the answer to your prayers or the devil in disguise? BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This dissertation looks at the two main methods of editing videotape; linear and nonlinear video editing. Nonlinear video editing (NLE) has been the main method used since its introduction in the early 1990s and has proceeded to make the more traditional method of linear videotape editing, which dates back to 1956, obsolete. Through examining both editing methods, this study has challenged the idea that NLE systems - which are viewed as quicker and more efficient - should be the only choice of video editing platform, by putting forward the argument that the added technology within NLEs may in fact be more of a hindrance than a help in certain situations. This study has not formed any definitive answers as to whether or not NLEs will remain the only choice, as this is subjective and remains the personal preference of the editor. However, the study has put forward valuable arguments supported by qualitative secondary research gathered from books and Internet sources. Qualitative primary research in the form of questionnaire-based interviews conducted with Editor and Educator, Charlie Watts, and Specialist Supports Analyst, Stephen Bellinger are also included. Interviewees were chosen for their experience using either linear video editing systems or nonlinear video editing systems. It is intended that this report will provide an insight for new editors who may have already disregarded linear video editing and make them question their choice.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Creative Technologies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 04 May 2011 13:34
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:28
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/2596

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