Are graphical user interfaces still relied on as a key navigation tool within a 3D environment, or can well defined level design and game mechanics alone be used as a reliable alternative in modern game development?

Harris, David (2010) Are graphical user interfaces still relied on as a key navigation tool within a 3D environment, or can well defined level design and game mechanics alone be used as a reliable alternative in modern game development? BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Now viewed upon as being simplistic, games in the 70’s and 80’s rarely needed to take into account the design considerations of navigation, this being due to their 2D form and more than often the entire “world” being displayed on a single screen viewing. With this no longer the case and games now producing vast non-linear based player experiences, the design of a navigation mechanic is an essential requirement in the development of a modern 3D product. While graphical user interfaces were an early form of design to help players navigate, thanks to technological advancements, developers are now beginning to design and implement more immersive forms of aid, helping to add to the realism and general player involvement within a product. This report aims to research the various approaches to navigation design and analyse and evaluate whether or not the industry is ready to remove graphical user interfaces altogether, guiding players through non-linear based environments via other more immersive means. The report divides itself between a literature review which offers much needed general knowledge into the area of navigation design, followed by more direct research such as tests and surveys which are built up from the initial findings within the study.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Creative Technologies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 03 May 2011 09:55
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:28
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/2589

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