Theft in the digital age: an investigation into piracy

Davenport, Christopher (2007) Theft in the digital age: an investigation into piracy. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The piracy of intellectual property via the internet is often claimed to be directly causing over $30 billion in losses to copyright industries every year. It is perhaps the most common form of internet related crime that is committed today. The unauthorised reproduction of copyrighted material is not a new problem but the rapid growth of the internet together with the technologies inherent in it, have granted criminals new possibilities for offence. These new opportunities pose great challenges to law enforcement agencies, the copyright industries, internet users and for criminologists. It is clear that the internet is here to stay for the foreseeable future and that its influence upon many parts of our daily lives is likely to increase. This paper intends to provide a balanced discussion of the many issues concerning some of the many issues surrounding piracy. It will focus upon issues including why is may be impossible to understand the full extent of the problem of piracy, how the new environment of cyberspace is changing the ways in which we think about crime, who the pirates are and what are the causes and motivations for their actions, and what law enforcement agencies are doing to respond to the challenges presented by piracy. It will provide critical discussion of the criminalisation of piracy and discuss what effect the copyright industries are exploiting their position of power in their battle to ensure their interests are kept safe.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Technology > School of Computing
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:47
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:13
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/258

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