Prioritising the confusion: addressing wildlife crime through an Intelligence-Led Policing paradigm

Morley, Amanda (2016) Prioritising the confusion: addressing wildlife crime through an Intelligence-Led Policing paradigm. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Within green criminology, there is incoherence surrounding the term and definition of ‘green’. This research examined the definitions made by key authors Lynch and Stretsky (2003), who recognised green crime as rather an act resulting in environmental harm. It is identified one predominant definition aligns corporate interest and human activity as means of excusing harm against the environment and species. The research identified Intelligence-Led Policing (ILP) unknowingly to exist since the sixth century as covert techniques were often used in war operations and undercover investigations. To form a decision based on intelligence gathered is a common process within an ILP paradigm, commonly associated with proactive policing. The National Intelligence Model (NIM) recognisably consolidates ILP principles with decision making and is effectively utilised amongst law enforcement and non-government organisations (NGO’s) within the UK. The research examined the deployment of the NIM by the National Wildlife Crime Unit (NWCU). It drew upon literature and gained knowledge to examine the process in which the NWCU uses the NIM to address wildlife crime. Subsequently, identifying critical issues regarding awareness, funding, cybercrime and intelligence. It was concluded that the future role and importance of the NWCU in and ILP paradigm relies on increased professionalism of intelligence gathering and imminent funding.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 21 Mar 2017 14:29
    Last Modified: 21 Mar 2017 14:29
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/24450

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