Situating social justice within the criminal justice system: a pragmatic study into social deprivation, crime, and their implications for English policy making

Reece, Jessica (2016) Situating social justice within the criminal justice system: a pragmatic study into social deprivation, crime, and their implications for English policy making. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Situating social justice within the criminal justice system, this study assesses the strength of relationships between crime and social deprivation, developing a statistical framework illustrating the links between crime and deprivation at a sub-national level. Focusing specifically on small areas within Hampshire, this study tests for neighbourhood effects, exploring the spatial distribution of crime across areas with varying levels of deprivation.
    Conducting secondary data analysis, this study uses police recorded crime (PRC) statistics, data from the English Indices of Deprivation 2015 and small area population estimates to explore the nature of relationships between crime and deprivation. Adding value to existing data, PRC data is combined with population estimates to calculate a crime prevalence rate, while new crime variables are created based on the pre-defined PRC categories. In assessing relationships between crime prevalence and deprivation, crime prevalence is observed at the overall level and considers separately acquisitive, property and violent offences, while social deprivation is considered in aggregate and considers separately individual deprivation domains.
    Following an in-depth literature review and the secondary data analysis, this study’s findings can be summarised as follows: First, results from this analysis find empirical support for findings of previous studies and academic theories linking high deprivation areas with high crime rates. Second, findings suggest that barriers to housing and services deprivation showed the weakest relationship with crime prevalence. Third, there is little variation in patterns of acquisitive and property offence prevalences when areas with different deprivation levels are compared.
    An evaluation and discussion of the implications of these findings highlight their potential to inform social and criminal justice policy at a local level, while identifying a number of pragmatic and conceptual challenges. However, given the quality of data and a focus of analysis at sub-national level, these findings should be interpreted with caution.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 21 Mar 2017 14:14
    Last Modified: 21 Mar 2017 14:14
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/24446

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