Why do some children and young people and not others, sustain maladaptive functioning following parental death, and how can the resilience of these children and young people be promoted?

Boulton, Jeanette (2009) Why do some children and young people and not others, sustain maladaptive functioning following parental death, and how can the resilience of these children and young people be promoted? BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This paper argues that grief should not be pathological, but rather perceived as a natural process, that is necessary to ensure positive mental and social adaptation following death. It provided an overview of the classical theories and models of loss and attachment that provides a framework from which the grieving process of children and young people and their surviving parents can be understood. It proposes that in order to promote the resilience of parental bereaved children it is necessary to have an understanding of how children respond to death in the social context of their family and environment. It agues that children’s adaptation following parental death is determined by the interaction of multi-determinism, personal, family and environmental risk and protective factors. It identified that if conditions are right children are able to grieve in ways that reflect the grieving process in adults and will make the necessary adaptation following parental death and therefore do not require professional intervention. It proposes that the resilience of those children who do not make positive adaptation can be promoted if intervention addresses socio-economic disadvantage, promotes positive parenting and enhances self-esteem and locus of control.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > School of Health Sciences and Social Work
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 28 Mar 2011 12:12
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:26
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/2354

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