A study identifying social and psychological factors that lead adolescence to succumb to the lure of gang culture

Borthwick, Hazel (2009) A study identifying social and psychological factors that lead adolescence to succumb to the lure of gang culture. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This study attempts to identify the Psychological and sociological factor that influence ‘gang membership’. The objectives are to define the gang and discover evidence of what constitutes a ‘gang member’. The media portrayal of the ‘gang’ is dominantly influenced by visions of American culture, the aim of the study was to analysis comparative research from the academic arena, to gain insight in to the UK viewpoint. Attention has been paid to the underlying causes of anti-social behaviour and delinquency. Life course, personal and social perspectives have been acknowledged.

    Findings suggest that there are vast amounts of differing theories concerning adolescents and delinquency, whilst studies were definitive about their relationship.

    It is suggested that the subculture phenomena of the ‘gang’ is a socially constructed group being drawn together by multiple oppressions such as socio-economic status, poor education and poor parenting, it is an aim of the author to distinguish policy incentives targeted at eradicating this.

    The author has extracted research from a mixed method approach, drawing from writer’s of sociological, psychological and criminological perspectives, this has brought a combination of both qualitative and quantitative findings that have influenced the recommendations of a ‘joined up service’ approach, incorporating a ‘whole family perspective’.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > School of Health Sciences and Social Work
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 28 Mar 2011 10:33
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:26
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/2353

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