Antidepressants vs cognitive behaviour therapy: a literature review to explore which is a more effective form of treatment for individuals suffering from moderate depression

Silk, Claire N. (2009) Antidepressants vs cognitive behaviour therapy: a literature review to explore which is a more effective form of treatment for individuals suffering from moderate depression. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (201kB)

    Abstract

    The aims of this literature review were to compare the effectiveness of both antidepressants and Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, to establish which form of treatment is more effective for individuals suffering with moderate depression.

    This literature review explores various topics, with particular focus on tricyclic and SSRI antidepressants, the anti psychiatry movement, the Physicians Desk Reference and patients awareness of side effects, whilst using a combination of both treatments, and issues in funding and availability. This study has identified that in theory, a combination of both CBT and antidepressants would be the best combination.

    Antidepressants target the symptoms, whilst CBT works towards changing the patients thinking patterns and behaviour, whilst teaching skills to help them cope and manage their illness. Although a combination of treatments would be the best option, in reality, there is not enough funding. GP’s are often forced to prescribe antidepressants, due to a lack of CBT and funding. Furthermore, information has raised the issue of GP’s not being able to suggest treatment in the best interest of their patients.

    The independent use of CBT is more effective rather than antidepressants alone, but only for individuals suffering with moderate depression. Relapse rates from antidepressants are considerably higher than CBT. This is due to the severity of the side effects, and length of time it can take before the medication has an effect, which can cause patients to stop taking their medication.

    Where antidepressants are prescribed as an only form of treatment, SSRI’s should be used over tricyclic’s because the side effects and toxicity are less. Computer based CBT should also be used to accompany antidepressants, as patients can often learn strategies to help them cope with their depression.

    Fewer than fifty per cent of individuals do not take their prescriptions due to the side effects. Compliancy rates for individuals taking their medication may be increased if more information was given to patients about how long they have to wait before they may feel an effect and if they were completely aware of what side effects to expect.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > School of Health Sciences and Social Work
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 25 Mar 2011 16:41
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:26
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/2346

    Actions (login required)

    View Item

    Document Downloads

    More statistics for this item...