The impenetrable geography of the city? Discuss the contention that, contrary to the belief that the city should be universally inclusive, urban design is, in fact enhancing the excluding and isolating effect of public space on people with disabilities

Trubshawe, Naomi (2006) The impenetrable geography of the city? Discuss the contention that, contrary to the belief that the city should be universally inclusive, urban design is, in fact enhancing the excluding and isolating effect of public space on people with disabilities. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    For able-bodied people, the physical environment is a location in which to travel, interact, and visually appreciate, a place to access opportunities, goods and services. Yet for someone with a mobility impairment, appreciation of the physical landscape is severely restricted. In few spaces are the disparities more distinct as in locations designed specifically for the purpose of public use and interaction. Through this investigation, I will challenge the ability of public space to provide all members of society with a location they can feel comfortable and accepted in. Using Portsmouth as a case study, I discuss whether recent adaptations to the legislation surrounding access for people with disabilities are feasible, if they can reasonably be applied to ensure those with mobility impairments can access services and facilities, and if people with disabilities consequently feel more included in public spaces within the city.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > Department of Geography
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:47
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:13
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/234

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