Have the Labour Government’s policies and legislation on youth offending led to the stigmatisation of young people within our communities, which in turn has resulted in an increase in the offending behaviour patterns of young people changing since coming to power in 1997

Cooke, Paul (2009) Have the Labour Government’s policies and legislation on youth offending led to the stigmatisation of young people within our communities, which in turn has resulted in an increase in the offending behaviour patterns of young people changing since coming to power in 1997. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The research undertaken as part of this dissertation was to investigate through a data analysis, whether or not the offending behaviour patterns of young people who had been admitted to secure accommodation have changed, and whether or not young people are now committing more violent and serious offences at an earlier age as a result of being marginalised by the Labour’s Government’s policies on youth offending.

    Using a quantitative methodology, the unit’s files and registers were analysed and key variable information was utilised from the sample group. The sample group consisted of 404 records from between 1998 – 2008 of sentenced young people between the ages of 11-16. All the young people included within the data had received a custodial sentence following being convicted of an offence which had been pre determined in to four specific categories to include Robbery, Violent Offences, Murder/Manslaughter and Other Offences.

    Information that was gained through the analysis comprised of age, gender and offence committed. The main findings from the research demonstrated that the age of young people being admitted to the unit was getting younger, whilst the severity of the crimes committed increased. Additionally the number of female admissions had steadily risen over the last four years, and this was in line with other research that had previously been completed by the Youth Justice Board (YJB) in 2009.

    For future research the inclusion of key variables such as ethnicity would be considered as an element to be included in any further research, so that a wider picture could be gained into how ethnicity affected the outcomes for young people in secure accommodation. Additionally looking at the offences committed and breaking this down into gender, and then focusing upon ages and crimes committed separately, would aid in the delivery of much clearer and substantial levels of data for analysis.

    Rather than undertake a study that does not require the input from any individual, a recommendation would be that questionnaires could be formulated to conduct further research with a more qualitative approach to gain insight into the personal views of young offenders and personal experiences of offending.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > School of Health Sciences and Social Work
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 25 Mar 2011 16:03
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:26
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/2333

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