Are the fundamental principles of existentialism more effectively conveyed through literary expression or through philosophical interpretation?

Giddings, Bethany (2015) Are the fundamental principles of existentialism more effectively conveyed through literary expression or through philosophical interpretation? BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Each piece of literature we read contains a meaning behind it; whether that be intended b the author, or interpreted by the reader. he significance behind each work is wholly dependent upon the themes and symbolism sewn into the text which, determine its outcome and impact upon the reader. This is especially true of philosophical fiction, which uses the literary framework to its advantage in order to express theoretical ideas in a more aesthetic and accessible fashion to the average reader. With literature being perhaps the most profound form of human expression its close relationship with philosophy offers a highly insightful basis for to encourage ontological thought. Since humanity became capable of critical thinking, the contemplation of life itself and metaphysical questioning has remained abundant, leaving literature a particularly useful means of expressing these thought in a creative and original form. Often, philosophical fiction explore themes of religion and the civilized world, offering a unique perspective on their altering relationship with humanity. But what about the texts which focus on what intrinsically, it is to be human? Some of the greatest works of philosophical fiction and arguably literature in general fall into the category of existentialism, for instance Fyodor Dostoyevsk s Crime and Punishment (1866) and Jean-Paul Sartre's Nausea ( 1938). The common theme in these novels and others in its category is the examination of both humanity and existence - essentially, existentialism can be deemed as the philosophical study of the human subject.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Media and Performing Arts
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 08 Feb 2017 15:34
    Last Modified: 08 Feb 2017 15:34
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/23202

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