Social implications of wind farms: Are the negative attitudes towards wind farms inhibiting their development??

Stevens, John W. (2006) Social implications of wind farms: Are the negative attitudes towards wind farms inhibiting their development?? BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (518kB)

    Abstract

    An investigation into the social implications of wind farms and the effect negative attitudes towards wind farms have on wind farm development This independent study has the research aim of examining the social implications of wind farm developments (proposed or complete) on rural communities, and from this, attempts to ascertain whether the negative attitudes towards wind farms, held by rural communities and action groups, are inhibiting onshore wind farm development. Moreover, it attempts to establish ways of reducing negative attitudes towards wind farms and increasing local community acceptance. Three principal research questions are established, forming the basis of the research. These are: � What are the social implications of large scale onshore wind farms? � Are negative attitudes towards wind farms and wind energy inhibiting large scale wind farm development? � How can negative attitudes towards wind energy be reduced? Preliminary research is presented in the literature review (see Chapter 2), where the main topics on wind energy and wind farm development is discussed: the history and development of wind energy, government energy policy targets, arguments for and against wind power, public opinion of wind energy, NIMBYISM and the future for wind farm development. A research framework is established in the following chapter which highlights the use of the case study wind farm proposal, the West Wight Technology Park (WWTP), and the importance of questioning residents in proximity to the proposed wind farm site, and a subsequent introduction to the case study is provided. The results of the case study findings are then presented and discussed with regard to the three key research questions and their relative sub-questions. Further to this, an evaluation of the research addresses the research strengths and limitations, the opportunities for research improvements and recommendations for further study. Conclusions are presented in the final chapter (Chapter 7), amalgamating the important findings of the three research questions, and is followed by a conclusion summary.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > Department of Geography
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:47
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:13
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/230

    Actions (login required)

    View Item

    Document Downloads

    More statistics for this item...