False representation: exploration of whether the police of England & Wales are sufficiently trained to deal with fraud based crime

Haynes, Wayne M.E. (2016) False representation: exploration of whether the police of England & Wales are sufficiently trained to deal with fraud based crime. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This dissertation, entitled False Representation: Exploration of whether the police of England and Wales are sufficiently trained to deal with fraud based crime, is, as the title suggests a need to ascertain if the police know what they are doing when it comes to investigating fraud based offences. By way of the use of secondary research methods utilising content analysis and narrative reviews, facts and information were drawn from sources including academic journals and government reports, as well as training modules and student handbooks. Through such data capture the objectives set predominantly oversaw scrutinising the training methods and resources provided to police officers at various stages of their career, and comparing that dataset with the training of a Counter Fraud Specialist. The outcomes and conclusions revealed that all areas of fraud training provided to police officers who will have to deal with fraud are extremely poor. It is only when an officer has completed any bespoke fraud training, only provided through external sources will they receive sufficient input to actually investigate fraud offences. Nevertheless upon comparing even the outcomes of such police fraud training courses with that received by a Counter Fraud Specialist it is still not good enough. A Counter Fraud Specialist is provided with a much more in-depth, wide ranging training course, which is backed up by a professional body and recognised qualifications, none of which the police officer can call upon. It is clear that in answer to the dissertation question of whether the police are sufficiently trained to deal with fraud based crime, that the answer is no.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2017 16:41
    Last Modified: 20 Jan 2017 16:41
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/22768

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