To what extent were the events of Bloody Sunday the catalyst to the IRA’s (Irish Republican Army) prolonged campaign of terror both in Northern Ireland and on the British Mainland and what can be learned from this?

Waller, Edward (2016) To what extent were the events of Bloody Sunday the catalyst to the IRA’s (Irish Republican Army) prolonged campaign of terror both in Northern Ireland and on the British Mainland and what can be learned from this? BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This paper explores the tragic events in Derry, Northern Ireland, in what became known as Bloody Sunday on 30th January 1972, with a brief outline of the political circumstances in the province leading up to that day, a focus on the immediate aftermath together with further examination and exploration of the consequences in the years following. The resulting protracted period of trauma for the victims’ families and the general public is explored together with the process of attaining conflict resolution in the form of the Belfast Agreement (Good Friday Agreement). The findings of the Widgery Tribunal Report are juxtaposed with those of the Saville Inquiry as the most important step forward in regaining the trust of the people of Northern Ireland by the British Government after the devastating events of Bloody Sunday. Over the next three decades some 3,500 innocent civilians would be killed as a result of the prolific campaign of terror instigated by the Irish Republican Army (IRA). Qualitative studies will place the events in context, highlighting potential, and sometimes lost opportunities, to resolve the ensuing conflict, together with key references and a focus on how lessons can be learned, both in the United Kingdom and indeed internationally, from this most poignant issue in British and Irish relations.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2017 15:21
    Last Modified: 20 Jan 2017 15:21
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/22758

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