Exploring relational security: an evaluation of differentiation in staff perception of relational security following intensive use of the relational security explorer, and the correlation between the use of relational security tools and reported relational security incidents within secure psychiatric healthcare settings

Brennan, Dawn (2016) Exploring relational security: an evaluation of differentiation in staff perception of relational security following intensive use of the relational security explorer, and the correlation between the use of relational security tools and reported relational security incidents within secure psychiatric healthcare settings. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The area of relational security is a greatly under researched area despite having been highlighted as a contributory factor in many security incidents within secure psychiatric settings (DOH 2010). Security incidents within secure settings can have serious consequences for the public, the patient and organisations involved. Within secure psychiatric environments it has long been recognised that relational security is intrinsically linked to risk assessment processes in determining and managing clinical risk, with the suggestion there is such a close correlation that security should not be dealt with in isolation (Tilt et al 2000).
    It is notable that the greatest advances in understanding and implementation of relational security measures have taken place within the last few years following the publication of SEE, THINK, ACT (DOH, 2010, Allen 2015). However there has been very limited literature and research which has examined this concept, or the impact and validity of relational security tools upon the clinical environment and reported security incidents. The study aims to evaluate if there is any differentiation in staff understanding following intensive use of relational security tools, and if any correlation exists between the use of relational security measurement tools and reported incidents of relational security. The study will seek to explore if the intensive use of relational security tools impacts upon staff perception, understanding or recognition in this area and the type or frequency of relational security incidents reported.
    The study employs a mixed methods case control design examining primary and secondary sources. Pre and post questionnaires were administered to 70 staff employed across the research and the control ward, applying statistical analysis to responses to identify any significant findings. Anonymised secondary data from the incident reporting system IRIS was analysed to identify any correlation between incident reporting and intensive use of the tools.

    Results and findings:
    Based upon the statistical analysis there does not appear to be any significant association or correlation between intensive use of the tools and staff perception of improved communication, understanding, recognition or reporting, however Chi Square identified statistically significant association between any previous use of relational security tools and impact upon practice, recognition, understanding and communication. The evidence would suggest that despite any significant correlation as a result of increased use of the tools, incident reporting from the research ward was impacted upon exhibiting increased emphasis on relational security and acknowledgement of relational security factors as outlined within the explorer tool. A number of limitations have been identified within the study which have implications for generalisation of the research and would require further exploration.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2017 15:07
    Last Modified: 20 Jan 2017 15:07
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/22756

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