An analysis into the marketing and merchandising of comic book films, through the study of the Batman franchise from Tim Burton to Christopher Nolan

Fattore, Emilio (2015) An analysis into the marketing and merchandising of comic book films, through the study of the Batman franchise from Tim Burton to Christopher Nolan. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (11MB)

    Abstract

    This dissertation has conducted research that analyses the overall importance of marketing and merchandising within comic book based blockbusters through the case of study of the Batman franchise. it uses this key text to analyse concepts such as transmedia storytelling and the notion of the paratext to investigate the levels to which a franchise is marketed and merchandised. A documentation of how the marketing and merchandising of a text has changed over the years is also provided. The synergetic aspects of a franchise are emphasised, as a study is made on how different franchises are able to synergise their texts to maximise their profits. Chapter l focused on the early days of the Batman comic book and its subsequent adaptation into a television show in the 1960s; with a conclusive analysis on Burton's interpretation in the 1989 blockbuster. Chapter 2 provided an insight into the failings of Batman & Robin (Schumacher, 1997), before analysing the marketing of Nolan's reboot in 2005. It concluded by exploring Marvel Studios as an alternate case study to Batman. Overall, this dissertation argues for the importance of the methods highlighted in ensuring the popularity of superhero films in the 21st century, as well as being one of the factors in Batman's success throughout the character's tenure in the media.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Media and Performing Arts
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 23 Dec 2016 09:51
    Last Modified: 23 Dec 2016 09:51
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/22725

    Actions (login required)

    View Item

    Document Downloads

    More statistics for this item...