Hair-raising horror: representations of hair and horror in Japanese cinema

Rodgers, Hayley (2015) Hair-raising horror: representations of hair and horror in Japanese cinema. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Japanese Horror films are one of the leading and most successful Japanese film genres; containing certain recognisable tropes such as the avenging spirit motif and masses of long black uncontrollable hair which relate back to Japanese culture and tradition. The aim of this dissertation is to investigate the significance of hair as a connotation of femininity and the horrific in contemporary Japanese horror films. This has been achieved through exploring the prominence of hair and femininity in Japanese culture, offering a historical contextualisation of Japanese horror texts and through textual analysis of representations of femininity in contemporary Japanese horror texts. Chapter one delineates the importance of hair and femininity in Japanese culture, and their relation to familial and social power structures. Chapter two further emphasises the symbolic and textual significance of femininity hair and horror within the narrative Yotsuya Kaidan through different popular medium and time period . This text has arguably provided particular tropes that contemporary Japanese horror films have taken influences from Chapter three examines this briefly before offering a contemporary anal is of femininity and horror using successful Japanese film text . By focusing on how femininity and the horrific are constructed through the use of hair, it notes repeated patterns within the horror genre. The overall conclusion that can be drawn from this dissertation is that in Japanese horror texts hair is representative of a source of control from a patriarchal society. Hair can also indicate a rejection of traditional values placed on Japanese women through the monstrous feminine and uncontrollable, untameable hair.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Media and Performing Arts
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 30 Nov 2016 15:22
    Last Modified: 30 Nov 2016 15:22
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/22717

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