The development of celebrity culture and commercialism in Reality Television: the case of Big brother

Matthews, Jessica (2015) The development of celebrity culture and commercialism in Reality Television: the case of Big brother. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (6MB)

    Abstract

    The idea of 'celebrity' has developed in recent decades, growing and enabling fans to have more access to their idols through the media and the internet.. In the past, fame has created 'stars' who possessed a particular talent. However, this has changed increasingly in recent decades to a focus on 'relatability', allowing seemingly 'ordinary' people to experience levels of fame. This dissertation analyses this change and questions how it is reflected in the media and specifically in the reality television genre. Using the case study of Big Brother, a format that has, arguably, been compromised by commercialism, it discusses how controversy and spectacle have changed the format of reality television in order to achieve maximum profit. It can be contended that the UK version of Big Brother has been more influenced by the 'celebritisation' of reality television than its American counterpart, and this dissertation interrogates how and why this has happened. As a result of this change in celebrity culture and the movement towards commercialisation, it can be stated that Big Brother has lost quality and has become increasingly 'disposable'. However, the series can be seen to reflect social issues and this dissertation discusses this reflection and questions whether the show has played an influential role in the progress of societal concerns.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Media and Performing Arts
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 30 Nov 2016 15:07
    Last Modified: 30 Nov 2016 15:07
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/22716

    Actions (login required)

    View Item

    Document Downloads

    More statistics for this item...