Reporting the Bosnian War in British and US newspapers

Crowle, Richard (2015) Reporting the Bosnian War in British and US newspapers. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The Bosnian War of 1992-95 is one of the most brutal and bloody affairs in recent European history. It is also regarded as one of the most poorly represented in the western media, culminating in a consensus misunderstanding in the general public. This dissertation argues that newspapers in the western media, specifically the United Kingdom and the United States of America, failed to objectively depict the war to the public whilst thoroughly demonizing the Serbs. Initially, a succinct historical context to the war is provided to offer an academic perspective to discussions to be made later in the writing. Following this, primary examples of contemporary newspaper reports are scrutinized to demonstrate the manner in which the war was portrayed within a World War Two narrative, simplifying the conflict as a simple dichotomy of 'good' vs. 'evil', 'right' vs. 'wrong', 'democracy' vs. 'fascism' etc. This is achieved by addressing the reportage of Serbian atrocities alongside similar acts committed by both Croatian and Bosnian forces. A similar argument is then created around the portrayal of Slobodan Milošević's apparent agendas in contrast to that of Franjo Tuᵭman's or Alija Izetbegović's respective political creeds, essentially concluding that newspapers in Britain and the U.S falsely constructed a narrative of one-sided aggression in which the Serbs were offered as the sole aggressors in a war driven by fascist ideology.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Media and Performing Arts
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 25 Nov 2016 15:16
    Last Modified: 25 Nov 2016 15:16
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/22710

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