The fallen woman and the ideal victim: the representation of female criminals and victims in the British press from 1997 to 2014

Hayler, Claudia (2015) The fallen woman and the ideal victim: the representation of female criminals and victims in the British press from 1997 to 2014. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (526kB)

    Abstract

    In recent years, female criminology and victimisation have been actively represented by the media. This paper examines the ideologies that surround female delinquents and victims in the media specifically looking at the British press. These ideologies have become paramount to societies understanding of women’s involvement in the criminal justice system. This study aims to build an understanding as to whether the media conforms to or challenges these ideologies. Firstly, this dissertation analyses the theoretical approaches to stereotyping in news reporting and the most dominant stereotypes of female criminals and victims including ‘The Fallen Woman’ and ‘The Ideal Victim’. Secondly, it will focus on four case studies including the victims of crime Holly Chapman, Jessica Wells and Katie Piper and the murderesses Tracie Andrews and Joanna Dennehy. By conducting a discourse and image analysis of British newspaper articles it helps to establish the techniques used by journalists to conform to or challenge the stereotypes. Finally, this dissertation concludes that the media conforms strongly to these ideologies and certain female criminals and victims have been severely under-represented. In future news reporting, this dissertation suggests that the media should challenge these ideologies so that females in these categories all receive fair and equal representation.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Media and Performing Arts
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 18 Nov 2016 16:11
    Last Modified: 18 Nov 2016 16:11
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/22699

    Actions (login required)

    View Item

    Document Downloads

    More statistics for this item...