The contemporary phenomenon of adaptations from print to audio-visual media, focusing on the popularity of the ‘trilogy’ and the ‘saga’.

Ames, Becky (2015) The contemporary phenomenon of adaptations from print to audio-visual media, focusing on the popularity of the ‘trilogy’ and the ‘saga’. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This dissertation will explore the adaptation industry and its presence within contemporary culture, whilst attempting to discover the success of trilogies and sagas. The first chapter will examine the cultural aspects that surrounds the adaptation industry in order to find the reasons for its success. This involves research into the concept of nostalgia and how this is exploited by adaptation, the financial benefits that adaptation gain from different weaknesses found within an audience, and some investigation into fandom studies and ‘geek’ culture as something that may prove to be useful when studying adaptation. The second chapter involves some original practical research with the carrying out of an analysis of two franchises with adaptation; The Tolkien franchise as a novel to film adaptation and The Walking Dead franchise as a comic book to television series adaptation. The analysis involves context, intertextual comparison and an ethnography for each. The final chapter studies the phenomena; the “trilogy”, the “saga” and “binge-watching” television. For this, there will be an attempt at applying Greg Metcalf’s longform television theory to the study of adaptation, and some informed prediction to what adaptations in the future might be like. The shift from artistic to nostalgic adaptation is highlighted, alongside the idea that instead of the adaptation industry exploiting the public, it is more of a two-way consensual relationship between industry and consumer. Other concepts brought forward include the possibility of comic books, television and the internet taking over the adaptation industry and pushing novels and film to the side due to many notable elements.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Media and Performing Arts
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 18 Nov 2016 16:06
    Last Modified: 18 Nov 2016 16:06
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/22698

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