Has commercialisation corrupted football during the Premier League era?: an investigation into the effects of commercialisation on English football since the Formation of the Premier League

Robins, Thomas (2016) Has commercialisation corrupted football during the Premier League era?: an investigation into the effects of commercialisation on English football since the Formation of the Premier League. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (394kB)

    Abstract

    This dissertation looks at the negative effects that commercialisation has had on English football since the beginning of the Premier League era in 1992. It is important to identify four major factors: television rights, sponsorship, foreign ownership and celebrity culture that have all contributed to the growth of the English top division, as well as the elite set of clubs that compete in the competition.
    The first aim of this study is to identify the importance that television rights consequently maintain on revenue streams for the Premier League. The second aim is to analyse the effect of sponsorship deals and their importance in targeting a new globalised audience. Thirdly, this dissertation assessed the role that foreign investment has played in the commercialised model that the Premier League now incorporates. Finally, there is a discussion into the increasing amount of press footballers receive, linking these ideologies to theories involving celebrity culture.
    This research finds that commercialisation has not only had an effect on English football, but is now one of the fundamental factors in promoting and maintaining the Premier League brand. Although beneficial for the division’s elite sides financially and commercially, fans and local communities are seemingly suffering as English football continues to become redefined as a commodified product, rather than a sporting event.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Media and Performing Arts
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 11 Nov 2016 12:43
    Last Modified: 11 Nov 2016 12:43
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/22656

    Actions (login required)

    View Item

    Document Downloads

    More statistics for this item...