Is domestic recycling worthwhile?

Smith, Joel D. (2006) Is domestic recycling worthwhile? BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This study considers the central debates around a controversial issue of household recycling methods. There are a number of methods employed by local authorities in order to collect household recycling, however, surrounding every method is a string of arguments as to the environmental, economic and social impacts associated. Focussing primarily on kerbside collection and drop-off schemes, this study uses the case studies of Wantage, Oxfordshire and Portsmouth to compare and contrast the recycling schemes in place. In collecting data, surveys were carried out to record participation rates. When visiting the drop-off sites, it was necessary to carry out questionnaires to gather data on people�s recycling behaviour. In order to understand thoroughly the decisions made by the local authorities in choosing a recycling method, telephone interviews were used to gather information from the local authorities environmental teams. Examples of European successes were brought in to examine the key problems faced in the U.K and the solutions used in Europe, mainly Switzerland. It was found that kerbside collection has proved to be more successful in terms of participation than drop-off sites, however, there are obstacles preventing kerbside collection from being the only method of collection, such as congestion problems and budgets preventing a local authority from changing their collection methods. The surveys in this study have also brought to light a number of fascinating future studies that would be worthwhile investigating, largely focussing on the social impacts of recycling.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > Department of Geography
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:47
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:13
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/226

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