Has international aid contributed to poverty reduction and development in recipients?: a case study of China’s foreign aid to Africa

Kimura, Akihiro (2016) Has international aid contributed to poverty reduction and development in recipients?: a case study of China’s foreign aid to Africa. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This dissertation examines the effectiveness and impact of international aid from the perspective of China’s aid to Africa. There are debates surrounding whether Chinese foreign aid, focusing on the excavation of natural resources, trade, investment, and non-conditionality, is beneficial for poverty reduction and development in Africa. Chinese aid and the Sino-African relationship clearly reflect core assumptions of both realism and liberalism. These two contending IR paradigms are useful theoretical frameworks to analyse aid effectiveness. This dissertation argues that although there are limitations of international aid on contribution to poverty reduction and development in recipient states, it is an increasingly effective means of reducing poverty and promoting development in poor countries today than ever before, due to the gradual prevalence of a liberalist paradigm in the post-Cold War era. China’s aid seems to have adopted a more liberalist approach, pursuing mutual benefits and development through trade and investment, rather than being restricted by a realist approach, stressing national interests. This tendency is seen in the case of the Sino-African relationship. Although Chinese national interests are related to its aid on African continent, China’s aid to Africa contributes to poverty reduction and development by promoting trade and investment between China and Africa.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Social, Historical and Literary Studies
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 28 Oct 2016 11:36
    Last Modified: 28 Oct 2016 11:36
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/22573

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