The rise of ISIS: an analysis of endogenous, exogenous and intermestic factors

Carr, Michael (2016) The rise of ISIS: an analysis of endogenous, exogenous and intermestic factors. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This dissertation seeks to provide a comprehensive analysis of the question: what caused the rise of the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS)? It seeks to examine Cockburn’s (2015) claim that the rise of ISIS was mainly down to the exogenous factor of Western intervention. In order to achieve this, it will look at exogenous, endogenous and intermestic factors resulting in the rise of ISIS. Firstly, this dissertation will examine the role that Western intervention has had on extremist groups. Secondly, it will examine the role that Islamist ideas have had on ISIS’s growth. Finally, it will consider the impact of the Arab Spring in exacerbating sectarian tensions within Syria and ISIS’s ability to exploit a vulnerable region. This dissertation will apply Posen’s (1993) theory on ethnic conflict and the security dilemma to the Sunni-Shia divisions in Iraq and Syria to facilitate an understanding of the success of ISIS. Conclusively, this dissertation will argue that a combination of exogenous, endogenous and intermestic factors have caused the rise of ISIS but there is a gap in research on ISIS’s organisational expertise and leadership, which must be understood to truly ascertain how ISIS has established itself so rapidly.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Social, Historical and Literary Studies
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 28 Oct 2016 11:19
    Last Modified: 28 Oct 2016 11:19
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/22570

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