Has the use of sanitised images in court gone too far? a critical evaluation into whether the jury should be presented with gruesome or neutral images

Jarvis, Sian (2016) Has the use of sanitised images in court gone too far? a critical evaluation into whether the jury should be presented with gruesome or neutral images. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Within current UK legislation, digital images undergo sanitisation before being utilised as evidence. It is proposed that by reducing the graphic nature of the image, the jury are more likely to adopt a rational thought process, in comparison to an experiential, more emotive response. Previous research has demonstrated that jurors usually become emotionally aroused when confronted with images that are graphic or gruesome. When subconscious negative feelings are produced, it is possible that emotions will impact the outlook of the case, altering the final verdict. Nevertheless, while graphic images may induce an emotive response, this is not necessarily going to influence a prejudice decision. Sanitised images are adapted to only show what is relevant in accordance to the barrister's requirements, creating a susceptible environment, where the juror's judgement is likely to be influenced. Primary research was conducted using a questionnaire, to assess if the use of sanitised images in court has gone too far. Conclusions revealed some undisputed results. A unanimous result revealed participants would rather be exposed to the original image, (even if this were accompanied by the sanitised image) irrespective of whether participants were emotionally affected, Therefore, this research suggests that consideration should be taken as to whether current practices need to be revised.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Oct 2016 14:41
    Last Modified: 20 Oct 2016 14:41
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/22467

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