Privatising a profession: the implications of transforming rehabilitation on probation ethos and practices

Beaven, Ross N. A. (2016) Privatising a profession: the implications of transforming rehabilitation on probation ethos and practices. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The inclusion of the private sector in offender rehabilitation has long concerned state-run criminal justice over its influence on treatment and its message. While government strategies have recently been implemented, flaws in this new system have begun to appear. This dissertation investigates this neoliberal push by assessing the implications of new reforms involving England & Wales's Probation Service. By using relevant secondary data to outline the development of practitioner values and methods, this study reviews current political reforms in offender management whilst evaluating how these new strategies have fared in existing working procedures and how traditional rehabilitative ideals have maintained with new service providers. Those working in the field of criminal Justice strongly challenged that private organisations will splinter the probation service. This is seen in this study as communication and IT resources between the divided institutions are destabilised severely due to complications when handling data. In addition, this research establishes that rooted ethos of rehabilitation persist amongst long standing practitioners despite conflict between intentions of profitability over quality of service. In light of this, this dissertation recommends that future research should examine this resistant group of probation officers
    considering little is known about these hybrid practitioners.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Oct 2016 14:21
    Last Modified: 20 Oct 2016 14:21
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/22460

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